Category Archives: Submissions

Whiptail Journal

No simultaneous submissions.

BIO: Rhonda Bronte Brown is a retired counselor/teacher who lives in Arkansas. Her published poetry appears in Better Than Starbucks Journal, the Trouvaille Review, Haiku Pond, and Haiku Seed Journal. Find her online at https://brontebrown2.com.
The heart my be fickled at times but when stirred to action becomes a bulwark. 
July 1-10: Themed (Personal Transitions, e.g. physical, emotional, spiritual, healing)
https://www.whiptailjournal.com/submissions.html

1. stormy days settle to walk above the clouds, life
2. tenacious tekkers travel twisted trails through time.
3. drifters venture on patterned pathways of speckled sunlight 
4. astonied hearts stirred to rise (Job 17:8 reference)
5. uproot weeds watered by tears. 

The heart may be fickled at times but when stirred to action becomes a bulwark. 

Waleshaikujournal.com/ Summer submission

https://www.waleshaikujournal.com/ Summer submission

Rhonda Brown                                                         Haiku Submission

1335 Montana Street                                                      Nature Theme

Conway, AR 71566



BIO: Rhonda Bronte Brown is a retired counselor/teacher who lives in Arkansas. Her published poetry appears in Better Than Starbucks Journal, the Trouvaille Review, and Haiku Seed Journal in February and March 2022. Find her online at https://brontebrown2.com.



1. 

Time spins laughter

into memories-

and memories 

into laughter. (Revised)

2.

life’s brief moments 

full of 

      beauty and 

            splendor- 

                 r 

                    a 

                  i 

                      n 

               i 

                  n 

                       g 

   pink 

            p 

             e 

               t 

                 a 

                    l 

                       s . . . 

  

  In memory of Robb Elementary school, Uvalde, Texas



3.  

Breathe the sunlit air, 

uproot weeds 

watered by tears.



4.

Mockingbird catcall signals a tail twitching taunt-

kitty in the weeds. 



5.

 A cool zephyr breeze flows over tender grasses, 

 goose pimples giggle.  



  Thanks for the great advice from my last submission. I hope these haiku capture one's imagination for greater interpretation.  I'm a WIP. 

Rust and Moth Submission June 17, 2022

BIO: Rhonda Bronte Brown is a retired counselor/teacher who lives in Arkansas. Her published poetry appears in Better Than Starbucks Journal, the Trouvaille Review, and Haiku Seed Journal in February and March 2022. Find her online at https://brontebrown2.com.
1.	Moons of March Sing!
        (Spring Moon, Worm Moon and Sugar Moon)

Sky looks down on earth with the dark eye of a new moon. Spring buds pop their heads and Winter snaps, not yet. March winds howl for seasonal winds that breathe change. Terrestrial tides collide and winter gives way. March moons call for a zephr to disperse seeds far and wide 

Worm Moon signals the nightcrawlers to rise, stir the loam, breaking free the frozen earth. Spring Moon coaxes sleepy seeds to shed winter’s shield and stretch their roots in fertile dirt. Under the Sugar Moon trees bud, enticing the sweet maples to release their sugary sap. 


"Zephyr, carry the seeds far and wide. Loam, provide their needs. Seeds, shed those winter coats. Nightcrawlers, dig underground moats. Clouds, let loose your showers so the earth can bring forth bouquets of flowers!"

A morrowless day
arriving on the equinox
perfectly balanced.  



2.	A Pastoral Cacophony Published Nov 2022 Better Than Starbucks Journal

As morning's first blush slips through the mizzling mist, dawn's chorus begins. The woodland world wakes, nestlings fluff their feathers, squish together and listen to their twitter song. 

Blackbirds sing a low mellow tone blending choral notes to a dayspring chant. Red-breasted robins' antiphonal tweets, twitters back and forth. A cool zephyr breezes through the budding trees, and a hermit thrush adds a rhythmic woodwind harmony. 

Chee-pippety-chee-chee, Jenny wren joins in with a light peppy lilt, stepping up the beat. Colorful warblers echo a descant as tiny rainbows shimmer in twilight’s dew. A cappella chorus in one voice sings a spring aria. 

A blue jay's catcall 
signals a tail twitching taunt,
kitty in the weeds. 

The aria ends with the soft adagio from a mourning dove. 
coo-COO-coo, coo-coo.


[Optional NOTES: Antiphon: alternate singing by two groups. 
Adagio: A tempo having slow movement; restful at ease.
Lilt: a pleasant gentle swinging rhythm, a characteristic rising and falling in the tune.]


3. The Afghan Thirteen 

The pulse is weak, 
life's last vapor vanishes. 
Death grins when 
breathing ceased. 

Thanatos’ grim triumph- 
of the Afghan thirteen, 
fallen, betrayed from within, 
and left behind. 

A country's demise 
at the hands of a few. 
America's heart bleeds.
They will not be forgotten. 

Hope hurts. Hope heals! 
Hope shatters the grip of hate- 
the past and present repeat. 
1776 to Aug. 26, 2021.

In memory of the men and women who died in service of our country and the freedom loving Afghan people. 
 

Sgt. Johanny Rosario Pichardo, 25, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, assigned to 5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade, Naval Support Activity Bahrain.

Sgt. Nicole L. Gee, 23, of Sacramento, California, assigned to Combat Logistics Battalion 24, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.


Staff Sgt. Darin T. Hoover, 31, of Salt Lake City, Utah. His military occupational specialty was 0369, infantry unit leader.

Cpl. Hunter Lopez, 22, of Indio, California, a rifleman, decorated marine.

Cpl. Daegan W. Page, 23, of Omaha, Nebraska, a rifleman, decorated marine.

Cpl. Humberto A. Sanchez, 22, of Logansport, Indiana, a rifleman, decorated marine.

Lance Cpl. David L. Espinoza, 20, of Rio Bravo, Texas, a rifleman, decorated marine.

Lance Cpl. Jared M. Schmitz, 20, of St. Charles, Missouri, a rifleman, decorated marine.

Lance Cpl. Rylee J. McCollum, 20, of Jackson, Wyoming, a rifleman, decorated marine.

Lance Cpl. Dylan R. Merola, 20, of Rancho Cucamonga, California, a rifleman, decorated marine.

Lance Cpl. Kareem M. Nikoui, 20, of Norco, California, decorated marine.

Navy Corpsman Maxton W. Soviak, 22, of Berlin Heights, Ohio, assigned to 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, Camp Pendleton, California, decorated Navy Corpsman.

Staff Sgt. Ryan C. Knauss, 23, of Corryton, Tennessee. Knauss was assigned to 9th PSYOP Battalion, 8th PSYOP Group, Ft. Bragg, North Carolina.



The Atchafalaya Basin by RL Brown

Across fourteen parishes the longest swamp river flows, the Atchafalaya River. The Cypress tree reigns as king in the sleepy waters of the Atchafalaya and Chitimacha rivers. They stand tall and proud, robed in a reddish-bark, untouched by time. Adorn with delicate leaves that sparkle in the sunlight, branches stretch to cover their domain.

If the Cypress is king then gators stand guard in murky waters beneath, keeping unwanted or unaware at bay.

This ecologically rich heritage is as diverse as the cultural peoples who have come to make it their home. European, African, Caribbean, and Native American descendants dug their roots deep into the bayou. The bayou blends them all into a cajun or creole cultural mix.

The Atchafalaya Basin by RL Brown
Narrative Non-fiction, prose

Across the boot parishes, 
a vast swampland exists
where the Cypress reign as 
keepers of the river forest. 

Underneath a feathery dome 
of twisted branches
robed in reddish bark,
resides the age-old kings. 

Gators serve as sentries 
guarding the murky waters below, 
instilling respect for life 
and doom for the ignorant. 

Sinkholes, shifting sand, 
watchful eyes always stare, 
ever mindful of 
a changing landscape. 

Stagnant water breeds 
relentless mosquitoes. 
Yet, yellow warbles and
purple martin feast. 

Host to mink, otters, muskrats, 
bears, deer, and bobcats, 
this bayou exists for life- 
and shares in its hardships. 

A river basin teaming
with bass, crappie, and crawfish, 
full of beauty and wonder. 
Its esse seeps into a Cajun's soul. 

Standing between worlds 
is a glimpse of immortality, 
a time passage that remains 
under the Cypress rule.	

Resources:
https://www.nature.org/en-us/about-us/where-we-work/united-states/louisiana/stories-in-louisiana/the-atchafalaya-river-basin/ 
https://www.basinkeeper.org/theatchafalayabasin#:~:text=Other%20animals%20that%20call%20the,%2C%20armadillo%2C%20fox%20and%20opossum.


The Atchafalaya Basin by RL Brown

Across the boot parishes, a vast swampland exists where the Cypress reign as keepers of the river forest. 

Underneath a feathery dome, robed in reddish-bark with shields of twisted branches, resides the age-old kings. 

Gators serve as sentries guarding the murky waters below, instilling respect for life and doom for the ignorant.

Sinkholes, shifting sand, watchful eyes always stare, ever mindful of a changing landscape.

A river basin teams with bass, crappie, and crawfish, full of beauty and wonder. Its esse seeps into a Cajun's soul. 

Stagnant water breeds relentless mosquitoes. Yet, the yellow warbles and purple martins feast. 

Host to mink, otters, muskrats, bears, deer, and bobcats, this bayou exists for life and shares in its hardships.  

Standing between worlds is a glimpse of immortality, a time passage that remains under the Cypress' rule. 
"The Atchafalaya Basin comprises an area of 860,000 acres of swamps, lakes and water prairies. Cutting a 15-mile-wide path across South Louisiana, it is the largest and last great river-basin swamp. But to fully comprehend and appreciate the magnificence of the Atchafalaya, you must journey back to when the Atchafalaya was as nomadic as its people.
Coastal Prairie, and its adjacent marsh habitat, provided immense spaces for waterfowl and thousands of other forms of wildlife."
"Other animals that call the Atchafalaya home include the Louisiana black bear, white-tailed deer, bobcat, coyote, alligator, beaver, nutria, mink, otter, muskrat, armadillo, fox and opossum."
"The Atchafalaya Basin comprises an area of 860,000 acres of swamps, lakes and water prairies.With each new season, the Atchafalaya Swamp changes its face. Winter blows in isolation and despair as the frigid morning fog rolls across the basin swamp. Spring signals a rebirth as lush greens and vibrant purples reach forward to embrace its new season. Sunrise in the basin awakens its creatures as snakes slither, and alligators and turtles bask in the sunlight. As the sun descends on another day, an eerie silence hangs on until the haunting cry of the egret penetrates the morning."

https://www.nature.org/en-us/about-us/where-we-work/united-states/louisiana/stories-in-louisiana/the-atchafalaya-river-basin/

https://www.basinkeeper.org/the-atchafalaya-basin#:~:text=Other%20animals%20that%20call%20the,%2C%20armadillo%2C%20fox%20and%20opossum.

New sites to research: 

https://www.bsaswampbase.org/atchafalaya-swamp

Poetry Pea Submission

haikuandsenryu.poetrypea@gmail.com
Rhonda Brown
1335 Montana Dr, Conway, AR 72034
About Bronte Brown
Thank you for this chance to enter a scifaiku, a very new form for me. 1. (Both in March and September, Equinox is perfectly balanced and shifts on each end to increase light or increase dark.) Sun and moon poised on a morrowless day equinoctial time shift. 1a.celestial bodies poised for a morrowless day. --- 2. (Tornados) Titans clash wrapped in clouded storms EF5 --- 3. Life's vanishing vapor, Thanatos grins. --- 4. habitat framers, clever, charming artisan, busy beavers. -- 5. entering the old haunt time ripples tock, tick, tock-tock-tock,

Submission only, not selected.

Failed Haiku Submissions

https://failedhaiku.com/

Rhonda Brown
1335 Montana Dr, Conway, AR 72034
@RhondaLBrown/Twitter
https://brontebrown2.com/ blog


Thank you, Bryan and Kelly, for taking the time to read my submissions.  I have a couple of rather long submissions, but if there is just a verse or two within that poem you want to select, that is okay too. I included a bio. 

 BIO: Rhonda Bronte Brown is a retired counselor/teacher who lives in Arkansas. Her published poetry appears in Better Than Starbucks Journal, the Trouvaille Review, and Haiku Seed Journal in February and March 2022.

As an active SCBWI and Storyteller Academy member, she participates in local and online critique writing groups. Her educational degrees include a BS and Masters, and she is a National Board-Certified Teacher. She is a newcomer to the publishing world. Find her online at https://brontebrown2.com.

1. Senryu /a renewed heart

Breath the sunlit air,
uproot weeds watered by tears,
stirred souls’ plant anew.

Rewritten as a Tanka- 31 syllables 
Tears flow
deep within                                                   
watering roots
of despair,                  
breathe the sunlit air-                                     
uproot weeds
nurtured by tears,  
stir the soul                
to start anew.                   

2. The Afghan Thirteen

The pulse is weak, 
life's vanishing vapor. 
Thanatos grinned when 
breathing ceased. 

Death's grim triumph- 
of the Afghan thirteen, 
fallen, betrayed, 
left behind. 

A country's demise 
at the hands of a few 
will not be forgotten. 
America's heart bleeds. 

Hope hurts, hope heals, 
shattering the grip of hate- 
past and present repeat. 
(1776)

Short Version: The Afghan Thirteen by RL Brown 
Death's grim triumph-of the fallen thirteen, betrayed, left behind.
Our soldiers' demise at the hands of a few won't be forgotten.


3. A Mississippi Oak /family ties
Deep within my roots, generational stories intertwine.

4. Published in Better Than Starbuck, February 2022, p. 41 (Encapsulation of Life’s seasons)
Winter folds a tree into a counterfeit death gray boney, lifeless. 

5. Echo
Mountains of precipitous words echo constant reverberation.
Reach into the world of words to find perspicacity. 


6. Moons of March
(Spring Moon, Worm Moon, and Sugar Moon, Equinox, Morrowless day occurs on the fall and spring equinox, a perfect balance of light and dark.)
Sky looks down on earth,
with dark eyes of a new moon
winks at the spring night,

Seeds shed winter's shield
as roots stretch in fertile earth-
March howls for spring's warmth,

Foretokens of spring
damp fields of marsh marigolds,
hoverflies delight.

Loam stirs, breaking free-
muddling nightcrawlers rise
under the worm moon.

Sugar Moon nearby
sweet maples release their sap,
as March winds breathe change.

Terrestrial tides collide
rising high, but twice a year.
sun and moon poised,

a morrowless day
arriving on the equinox
perfectly balanced.


7.  Spring's Aria 

Morning's first blush slips through the mizzling mist, 
dawn's chorus begins. 
Antiphonal tweets, robins, warblers, blackbirds sing
dayspring's symphony. 
The woodland world wakes, feathers fluffed, nestlings listen, 
to their someday song. 
Blending choral notes, blackbirds add a mellow tone 
to twilight's day-song.
Chee-pippety-chee, chee-chee, 
Jenny wren joins in with a peppy note. 
A rainbow shimmers in the morning dew; 
colorful warblers echo a descant. 
An a cappella chorus singing a spring aria, 
as songbirds unite. 
“siiih, siiih" “chink chink chink," a sudden signature change, 
the sunrise song fades.
A blue jay's catcall signals a tail twitching taunt, 
kitty in the weeds.
The aria ends with the soft adagio 
from a mourning dove.
perch-coo, coo-COO-coo, coo-ah, coo-coo-coo

Short Version: 

Morning's first blush slips through the mizzling mist, 
dawn's chorus begins. 
Antiphonal tweets, robins, warblers, blackbirds sing 
dayspring's symphony.  
The woodland world wakes.  



8. The Dignity of Winter by R Bronte Brown (96)
Trouvaille Review, February 15, 2022 Publication

Wind rustles the leaves.
Trees shimmer, yawning deeply,
Anticipation.

Autumn equinox
the balance of light and dark,
time juncture converts.

Turn your face eastward.
Fall moon on the horizon
blazing golden hues.

Extravagant colors!
A migratory bird's last song,
Light wanes for evening.

Winter grants Fall's wish
for an encore flower dance,
frost procrastinates.

Nature splendor yields
a harvest of abundance,
Thankfulness expressed.

Inner autumn calls,
time to embrace season’s change.
The wind howls for rest.

Winter winds whistling
Indian Summer's last stance
Bowing gracefully

Winter’s dignity
lifeless trees' quiet strength
autumn seeds nestled deep-

sheltered. 

Thank you so much. I hope some of these failed haikus meet your expectations. 

Sincerely yours,

Rhonda Brown

whiptail: journal of the single-line poem/ April submission

Individual 3-5 one line poems

kindness ripples and rips through-meanness
hitch a ride matching a clarion call. 
death’s grim triumph of the fallen thirteen
a snake is not what I seek, obviously 
behind the doorway trailing intentions
April 1-14: Unthemed

What to submit:

Individual poems - Please submit 3-5 one-line poems of any variety, including monostich haiku, senryu, one-line tanka, poetic fragments, one-line micropoems, or lyrical lines.
​
Sequences - Please submit 3 sequences of up to eight single-line poems. Sequences should have a title, should link and shift between each individual poems (or poet, if collaborating), and not have obvious repetition throughout the sequence OR TITLE. Additionally, they should travel. Feel free to submit any format of sequencing you like.
​
​Poetic images - One-line concrete poetry, and haiga, shahai, and vispo that employ a single-line poem will also be considered. Prose sentences will not. Submit 3-5 in 600 dpi+.
​​
​Submissions of a mix any of the above are welcome up to 5 total.

Haiku Journal Submissions

https://haikujournal.org/ https://haikujournal.org/submit/poets-main.php

March 26, 2022

1. Sky looks down on earth
eyes as dark as a new moon,
spring winks at the stars. 


2. Breath the sunlit air,
uproot weeds watered by tears,
freed souls plant anew. (hope or peace)
 
3.Twitters, humming beats, 
dashing fliers zip around, 
swiftest wings, unfurled.

Others poems to consider

Foretoken of spring
Marsh marigolds in damp fields
Hoverflies delight

Terrestrial tides collide 
rising high, but twice a year.
sun and moon poised.

A morrowless day
arriving on the equinox
perfectly balanced. 

Sugar Moon shines down ( Sugar Moon nearby)
sweet maples release sorghum
as March winds breathe change.

Habitat framers
Curious, Cautious, Clever
As busy as a-
beaver (WIP)

March 2022 Submission/Trouvaille Review

Moons of March 
(Spring Moon, Worm Moon and Sugar Moon)

Sky looks down on earth,with dark eyes of a new moon
winks at the spring night.  
Seeds shed winter's shield
as roots stretch in fertile earth-
March howls for spring's warmth,

Foretokens of spring
damp fields of marsh marigolds, 
hoverflies delight. 

Loam stirs, breaking free-
muddling nightcrawlers rise
under the worm moon. 

Sugar Moon nearbysweet maples release their sap,as March winds breathe change.

Terrestrial tides collide 
rising high, but twice a year.
sun and moon poised,

a morrowless day
arriving on the equinox
perfectly balanced. 
Senryu /a renewed heart 
Breath the sunlit air,
uproot weeds watered by tears,
stirred souls’ plant anew.
Rewritten as a Tanka-
31 Syllables
Tears flow
deep within
watering roots
of despair.
Breathe the sunlit air,
uproot weeds
nurtured by tears,
stir the soul
to start anew. 
2. Ode to Childhood
Hopscotch with shells and whirlybirds,
swinging weeeee with our words.
Walking with cousins barefoot in the grass
playing with friends, hoping summer will last.

No school, outside and free,
it is time just to be me-
on the porch swing, shelling peas
I prefer snap beans, please.

Straight from the garden, a summer snack.
chores done, potatoes stored in the shack.
Childhood summers make me wish for more,
tree climbing, river-side camping on a sandy shore.

3. Ode to Daffodils.
Bordering Mamaw’s cotton field
Besides Momma's fence
To my backyard
Daffodils.
Clerihew- rhyming couplets, poking fun at celebrities.

President Donald J Trump
was fond of the campaign stump.
He was a shaker and a policymaker,
Unlike President Nixon, who was a quaker.

Submission to Haiku Foundation for February 2022, KuKai- sky and sea

https://thehaikufoundation.org/still-time-to-submit-to-the-february-2022-thf-monthly-kukai/
Submission to Haiku Foundation for February 2022 , 
KuKai- sky and sea

January sky
Its sheer so clear, so blue. 
Nothing leaves a mark. 

On gradient winds, 
matching a clarion call
Eagles hitch a ride. 
Read their Journal
Follow Submission Guidelines
When submitting to multiple journal, if your submission is selected by one journal, you must let the other journals know. This policy is often stated in submission guidelines.